Some Girls Do (1969)

*. There were three Harry Palmer movies with Michael Caine in the 1960s. Four Matt Helm movies with Dean Martin. Two Flint movies with James Coburn. Even a couple of Dr. Goldfoot adventures (a rare instance of the villain being the franchise). And also two Hugh “Bulldog” Drummond flicks.
*. But that was it for those heroes. Meanwhile, in the 1960s alone there were six James Bond movies (seven if you count Casino Royale), and as of 2020 there have been 27, with more, I’m sure, on the way. I don’t think we can attribute this all to the strength of the Bond brand either. The Bond films were better movies. Meanwhile, I don’t think anyone would want another Bulldog Drummond picture after this.
*. To be honest, I’m not sure many people wanted another Bulldog Drummond picture after Deadler Than the Male. But they basically got the same thing served up over again, with the same star (Richard Johnson), same director (Ralph Thomas), and even the same plot. Once again a criminal mastermind (James Villiers, who likes to dress up like the Duke of Wellington in his off hours) has collected a bevy of beauties to kill off a bunch of high-ranking men in order to sabotage some big corporate deal. The first scene is nearly identical to that of Deadlier Than the Male, only with the sexy stewardess opening a plane door to suck the victim out to his doom instead of blowing the jet up in mid-air and parachuting to safety.
*. Of course these movies were part of the ’60s wave of Bondmania, though it’s interesting to note in this regard that Drummond isn’t a spy. Instead, I believe he’s some kind of insurance investigator. He also doesn’t seem to use the nickname Bulldog very much here. At least I don’t recall it being used. He’s just Drummond. Hugh Drummond.
*. So basically a retread of Deadlier Than the Male, which wasn’t much good in the first place. Bond on the cheap, which is something you notice the most in the action scenes. The girls, headlined by Daliah Levi, are hot, and the camera a little more leering. Though this time out many of them are genuine fembots, albeit still unlikely to be able to resist Drummond’s charms.
*. Actually, the tech angle is the most interesting thing about Some Girls Do. The villain’s master plan involves the use of an “infrasound” weapon in the form of what looks like a radio, which may be meant as a commentary on the pop music at the time. But what I really enjoyed were the little things like the Deluxe Auto Vac, an early Roomba, and those ’60s Ericophon (or cobra) telephones that seem so weird and totally impractical. I mean, they look neat but form doesn’t always follow function, does it?
*. Otherwise this is less than the original. There’s a drippy theme song and Drummond’s nephew is replaced by some twit from the British embassy for comic-relief. The plot didn’t make a lot of sense to me, but then I wasn’t paying much attention. It’s really disposable stuff.

28 thoughts on “Some Girls Do (1969)

    1. Alex Good

      If I remember correctly I saw this as a YouTube video that wasn’t the best quality. If I can’t get a decent screen grab I do without. I have standards!

      Reply
      1. tensecondsfromnow

        I think a motion of censure would be the least JT could organise. Joanna Lumley=force for good. Leprechaun= Rubbish. Anything unclear to you about that? Not cancel culture, just consequences…

      2. Alex Good Post author

        You’d get into all kinds of issues. The Leprechaun is representing various national and supernatural demographics. This makes him untouchable. Joanna Lumley, not so much.

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