Children of the Corn III: Urban Harvest (1995)

*. We’re not in Nebraska anymore, cornhuskers. We’ve moved to Chicago. But while you can take the boy out of the corn patch . . .
*. This is not a movie that gets a lot of love (to put it mildly), but on the whole I prefer it to The Final Sacrifice (which was Children of the Corn II). There are some imaginative practical effects that are actually pretty good, at least until He Who Walks Behind the Rows finally puts in an appearance.
*. Or maybe that’s not He himself but just some garden variety corn demon that He summons at the end. I have to say I find the One Who Walks Behind the Rows to still be a pretty vague concept. Some fans complained that this film made a mess of the series’ “mythology” but I can’t figure out what that mythology consisted of in the first place. Is He the anti-Christ? Why would He have any relation to Christianity at all? In the original (and Stephen King’s story) the children use a Christian Bible, albeit one that leans heavily on the Old Testament. But the Bible here, despite being decorated with a cross, seems more like the Necronomicon. Is He Who Walks etc. supernatural, or uber-natural, being some kind of pagan fertility spirit? I don’t know.
*. The connection to Native American mythology, introduced in the previous film, isn’t mentioned. They still hold on to the idea though that the cult is a sort of youth Green movement, fighting against pesticides and pollution. This may be demonic corn, but at least it will be organic too. But such a message also sends mixed signals. Shouldn’t we appreciate the youthful idealism of this children’s crusade? Don’t we nod our heads a bit when Eli tells them that blindness comes with age and that children represent the purity of the land? I have to say, I’m with the kids on this one.
*. Charlize Theron’s film debut. I didn’t know that when I was watching. She’s one of the followers and gets attacked by killer corn vines in a rather suggestive way. Give the woman credit, she paid her dues.
*. Corn plants, by the way, do not have vines. I kept wondering where they were coming from.
*. As someone who has worked with corn a bit I feel the need to point this out. You don’t use scythes or sickles to harvest corn. They won’t cut the stalks, which are far too tough. You use a scythe to cut grass or grains. You also can’t cut a corn stalk with garden shears. If they really wanted to get rid of that urban corn patch I’m afraid they’d have to pull the plants up by the roots. Which is hard work even when the roots don’t go all the way to hell.
*. The premise here is pretty silly and, as discussed, the mythology (if we must use that word) is all over the map. It does have a kind of kitschy charm to it though, with the evil corn playing a similar role to the troll food in Troll 2. And even though I find the giant demon at the end ridiculous, it’s kind of fun as well. How could it not be when it’s credited to “Screaming Mad George”? Since there’s no way anyone coming to this movie could possibly expect it to be any good I don’t have to tell you to keep your expectations low. If you do you might find it worth your while.

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